Today’s information is being shared with you from the point of view of a layperson (that’s me) who has both observed DBT done with my child and participated in a course of DBT, myself. Full disclosure: I’m a life-long chronic depressive who has done years (and years and years) of various therapies, and while I will never be “cured,” I have (mostly) learned how to manage my symptoms and live a normal life. Many of the different types of therapy I’ve done have been beneficial, but DBT remains, to my mind, the single most practical plan for managing difficult emotions and keeping them from disrupting my life. [That said, please note that I am not a doctor or mental health professional, nor do I play one on TV or the internet.]

If you’ve heard of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT)—and it’s quite possible you haven’t—you’ve probably heard that it’s an “extreme” approach for people with really difficult-to-treat behaviors such as suicidal ideation. While it’s obvious why this is a treatment of choice for individuals engaging in life-endangering behaviors, I’m here to tell you in all sincerity that I wish DBT was being recommended to every parent dealing with a struggling child or struggling themselves with the difficulties of parenting . But hang on; I’m getting ahead of myself. Read More