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Toddlers Who Throw Toys, Food & Other Hard Unyielding Objects

Apr13

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Advice Smackdown ArchivesHi Amy,

Congrats on the 3rd little one, boys are so much fun, as you undoubtedly know. I have two myself, twins who turned 16 months this week. Which segues into my current conundrum. One is suddenly not very nice and doesn’t listen and we’re not sure what to do about it or where to turn.

Long story longer, they have both always been incredibly easygoing, though the one in question was the Baby A, (the “older” one if you will, by a whole whopping minute!) has had a shorter temper and is ever-so-slightly impatient if he is not tended to in his desired timeframe (think diaper changes, meals, snacks, etc.) and we half-heartedly joke that he thinks he is an only-child and mistakenly believes the world revolves around his needs. But, the reality of twins is it simply doesn’t. Mostly though, he is a sweet boy who really is pretty laid back. We have always been pleased with both boys in public, they sit nicely in their stroller, behave in restaurants, smile at strangers, don’t make a scene, etc.

Then this week. Not. As. Much. When we went out to dinner this past weekend, our darling Baby A threw every bite of anything we gave him onto the floor. He would sign for cracker, I would hand him a cracker, and he would take it from my hand, declare “Uh-oh!” and deliberately pitch it directly onto the floor. We withheld crackers. He did the same with french toast. Bit by bit. Then just picked up the plate and flung the french toast through the air. He has proceeded to do this with every single meal all week, regardless of its contents. Even if it is his beloved cheddar bunny crackers. (which he asks for directly by signing then throws them.) He has also started throwing toys at me, our nanny, Daddy and, unfortunately, his brother. He threw a doll at another mother at Storytime at the library (how embarrassing.). He takes off his shoes and throws them around the car. (can’t wait until one hits me while I am driving.)

Meanwhile, brother takes it in stride, cries when he’s clobbered on the head with a book or a car, and quietly eats everything we put in front of him. He has not picked up any of this behavior. This throwing everything started immediately after both boys were assessed for early intervention, during which therapists asked him to throw a ball, and he figured out how to do it and hasn’t stopped. The other kid also threw the ball, and was the one who actually qualified for EI for speech, and hasn’t been a problem.

So here’s the thing, I know he’s 1, and he’s learning, it is probably just a phase but I have no idea what to do about it. We have tried removing the thrown item, scolding “No No, that is not good manners, we don’t throw food/toys/books”, re-direction, and time-outs. He doesn’t seem to “get it”, and I don’t even know where to start with discipline. I admit to being a little overwhelmed on the discipline front and I don’t know that we’ve really mapped out a method or attached to a specific camp. I know both boys hear and understand commands, but it’s like they don’t care and don’t listen and we’re worried if we don’t do something now, he’s going to be the raving lunatic kid we can’t take in public lest he climb up the walls.

I am a huge believer in nature over nurture from watching these guys. They have been different from day 1 and even before. They have the same experiences day in and day out but one has chosen the path of not hurling items all over the house. We are at a loss of how to address this and hoped maybe someone else can shed some light. Our pediatrician recommended time outs as early as 12 months when he went through a little biting phase, but he didn’t stay in one spot and we couldn’t really communicate the cause=effect-ness of it. We also didn’t want to associate bed/pack-n-play/etc with punishment, so we sort of never knew where to do time out. Clearly you can tell we’re not really ready for the behavior of toddlerhood. Any direction you can point us in is helpful. Books, methods, websites, etc. But please remember I have TWIN TODDLERS so books should be succinct. (unlike this email, sorry. )

Thanks,
Frustrated mom of 2.

As I’m sure you’re read on other parenting sites — though possibly not necessarily believed — your son’s behavior is TOTALLY NORMAL. Many, many young toddlers (particularly those who DO spend a lot of time with other toddlers) go through a hellish aggressive phase of hitting, biting, throwing things and general orneriness, and this phase tends to last juuuuuust long enough to make their parents start wondering if their sweet little baby has turned a permanent corner into SOCIOPATH.

Noah went through a phase where he threw things at people…around 18 months old, if my memory serves me correctly. It was similar to your experience, in that it came on the heels of learning to throw a ball and then YAY FOR THROWING EVERYTHING! He would toddle adorably over to me with a smile on his face and some pointy plastic object in his hand and then BAM. Said pointy plastic object would get lobbed directly at my head. If I reacted with a yelp of pain or a “big” roar-y scolding or anything, he’d laugh. And it didn’t take long for him to figure out that he could elicit a similar reaction from me by just using his hands, and we moved into a full-on hitting phase. The weird thing was that I never really saw him turn his aggression towards his playdate friends — I alone bore the brunt of his pint-sized abuse. And it rarely actually had anything to do with his anger or frustration levels — it really was more like a game or a curious little science experiment on his part.

It was awesome. But it was normal. It was, in fact, one of the few brief times Noah’s toddlerhood development actually landed square in the realm of “typical,” unlike his speech and motor development. But this didn’t make it ANY EASIER to deal with. Because curbing aggression in toddlers takes time, patience and consistency. And LOTS of all three of those things. The “experts” at Early Intervention weren’t going to come in and save me from my daily stacking-bucket head injuries, you know?

Your son is testing limits (from you), inventing games (the food-throwing), exploring cause-and-effect (what happens when I do THIS to my brother?) and expressing frustration about his limited vocabulary and communication skills. There are definitely more preferable ways for him to do ALL OF THESE THINGS, but when you’re dealing with a very small person with very poor impulse control and no real capabilities for logic and empathy, it takes a loooooooong time to get the preferable response to be the FIRST response.

Thus, most parents end up in the same place you are, where you feel like you’ve tried everything you’re “supposed” to do with little effect. But honestly, it doesn’t mean you’re doing anything wrong, or that your son is, in fact, headed towards an unavoidable fate of bullyhood and lifelong behavior problems. It just means you have to keep at it, keep doing the same thing — the same reaction, the same consequences — over and over again.

Here’s how we eventually curbed Noah’s hitting/throwing behavior:

1) Toddler books aimed at the specific behavior. There’s a great line of picture books that target all kinds of less-than-desirable toddler behavior and phases. “Hands Are Not for Hitting,” etc. There are a couple different editions for different age ranges, but we used the basic board book at just-under-two and found it to be at the right level. There’s a parent section with additional tips, and we really, REALLY saw an impact once we adopted the book’s “script” into our reaction to the behavior, EVERY TIME. “Hands are not for hitting. Hitting hurts.” The end. Simple words your young toddler can understand, without launching into above-his-head logic that he’s not ready for, like, “how would YOU feel if so-and-so hit YOU? you would feel bad, right? so-and-so feels bad! say you’re sorry to so-and-so! and now go to the naughty step!” That’s way, way too much language for a child your son’s age, even though it can be tempting to go overboard like that, particularly if he’s misbehaved in public or hit someone else’s child.

If you find the Best Behavior series to be a bit over his head or not holding his interest, there are also lift-the-flap versions for even younger children. Check out “No Hitting!” or “I Can Share.” Whatever you go with, cull your discipline script from the book’s language. Don’t yell or raise your voice, just repeat the Phrase That Pays in a calm, even tone that doesn’t give your toddler the “big reaction” or “horrified funny face” he might be seeking.

2) Zero warnings. React to the behavior the first time, every time. Now that Noah is five, we usually give him a warning or two about naughty/impulsive behavior, like grabbing toys from his brother or less-than-awesome manners at the table. But that’s because he knows better. And he knows better because of all the times when that behavior was disciplined swiftly the very first time. So no “if I see you throw that toy one more time…” or “hey! don’t hit! you know better!” The first time he throws a toy, the toy gets taken away and put up high on a shelf, preferably where he can see it. “Toys are not for throwing.”

At this age, time-outs should be only one or two minutes at the most — any longer and the message is long lost, honestly. You may need to stay with him the whole time (we always used a bottom step, or a chair if we were somewhere without stairs). We taught Noah the sign for “sorry” and repeated the script before letting him up: “Hands are not for hitting/toys are not for throwing/etc.” Then we ended with a hug, and the toy would be returned (though I think we did experiment with longer top-shelf banishments and I can’t remember what scenario worked best), with one last “TOYS ARE NOT FOR THROWING” reminder. If he threw it again, the toy went away again and we repeated the whole process. A lot. Eventually it sunk in. After like. A month. Or more.

As for the food throwing, again, this is SO NORMAL, and really, not even something you could consider “misbehaving” on purpose. He’s doing it because it’s fun, because it gets a reaction, because he’s bored and not really that hungry even though he’s asking for the food in the first place. Ezra sounds a lot like your other son, and while he hasn’t gone through an aggressive/biting/throwing phase, he DEFINITELY went through a throwing food phase. (And now that he’s out of the high chair, a “getting up and wandering around during mealtimes and coming back repeatedly to graze” phase that also drives me nuts.) Try limiting the food choices in front of him to only one or two bites at a time. Get plates and bowls with the suction cups on them. Once he throws food, assume he is done, even if he hasn’t eaten much of anything. “Food is not for throwing.” It’s sooooo common at this age for kids to subsist on what SEEMS like barely any food. Watch out on how often he gets snacks during the day and try to refrain from using the crackers as pre-meal entertainment at restaurants — they fill up ridiculously fast and thus want out of the high chair before the food has even arrived, and once they’re done, they’re DONE, and you are going to lose that battle if you keep trying to offer more/different foods, no matter how yummy or desirable they are. Try toys hidden in plastic containers he can open and close — and toys that can also be taken away the minute they’re chucked on the ground. (Mommy picking toys up and giving them back over and over again is the most FUN GAME EVER, so just…refuse to play from the start.)

He’s probably a little young to be asked/expected to clean up the mess he makes…but it might not hurt to involve him in the very boring clean-up process when he deliberately makes a mess with food. Ask him to pick up the crackers and put them back in a bowl, hand him a towel to wipe the floor, etc. Praise him when he does this…and definitely praise him when he does make it through a meal without pitching food through the air. (Or when he plays nicely without throwing toys, or keeps his shoes on in the car — big smiles, big hugs, big reactions. The opposite of the calm, stern boring reaction he gets when he misbehaves.)

You’re doing FINE, and so is your son, really. He is so normal and so is the feeling you have of being completely ineffectual at toddler discipline. They are really, really good at making you feel that way, but you’ll get it, and so will he. Just expect that yes, it probably won’t happen the third or fourth time you discipline him for the same behavior. Try more like the 3,424th time.

__________________________________________________________________
If there is a question you would like answered by Amalah on the Advice Smackdown, please submit it to amyadvice@gmail.com.

About the author

Amalah

http://www.amalah.com
Amalah is a pseudonym of Amy Corbett Storch. She is the author of the Advice Smackdown and Bounce Back. You can follow Amy's daily mothering adventures at Amalah. Also, it's pronounced AIM-ah-lah.

If there is a question you would like answered on the Advice Smackdown, please submit it to amyadvice@gmail.com.

Amy also documented her second pregnancy (with Ezra) in our wildly popular Weekly Pregnancy Calendar, Zero to Forty.

Amy is mother to rising first-grader Noah, preschooler Ezra, and toddler Ike.


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18 Responses to “Toddlers Who Throw Toys, Food & Other Hard Unyielding Objects”

  1. Olivia Apr 13 at 10:19 am Reply Reply

    My daughter still throws things a lot and she’s 2. For throwing food/plates at mealtimes we taught her the sign for “all done” so she could tell us that instead of throwing. We watch her like a hawk and once she starts playing around we take th plate away. In the beginning she was throwing other things because it was fun and she was exploring. Now she is purposely throwing things because she is mad at us. I hold out a shoe  and say, “Let’s put on shoes”. She grabs the shoe and throws it. *sigh* We just keep keep reminding her not to throw things and try to get her to pick them up when she does. She’ll stop throwing things by the time she’s in college, right?

  2. Susan Apr 13 at 11:10 am Reply Reply

    You don’t know how “right on time” today’s question and answer are for me today. My almost two-year-old boy is going through an agressive phase of refusing to share toys, biting, hitting and throwing. I’m going to look into some books and maybe DVDs. I’m at the point where I’m scared he’s going to get kicked out of his really good daycare. At home, we’ve tried time outs, talking, role playing, praise for positive behavior, you name it. I guess we just need to repeat, repeat, repeat. My sympathies to others going through this. It’s definitely a trying time.

  3. Kate Apr 13 at 11:26 am Reply Reply

    My 23 month old throws everything. We did manage to nip the throwing food in the bud by watching him closely and removing the food and saying “all done” as soon as he started to throw. He was perfectly capable of signing “all done” but it was more fun to throw. 

    I’m really having a hard time with the toys though and my husband isn’t helping. The other day my son brought a ball from his playroom into the TV room and my husband started throwing it with him. Weeks of working on not throwing things in the TV room (so that he doesn’t break the TV) gone in a second. My husband did stop once I saw and said something but the damage was done. Fwiw I think it’s too hard for him to understand that he can throw a ball but not a megablok so since he’s not throwing things at people I let him be as long as he’s in the playroom.

  4. MR Apr 13 at 11:31 am Reply Reply

    My daughter is 2.5 and all of this behavior is SO NORMAL! I totally agree with Amalah, when they throw a toy, take it, say “Toys are not for throwing!” and do a quick time out. We found what worked best was to put our daughter on the wall. A friend does that and the advantage there is you can do it ANYWHERE, so it is easy to be consistent. We also would redirect her throwing by teaching her to roll a ball.
    Throwing does rapidly progress to hitting (all totally normal), so be prepared to redirect there. We had one of those mallet toys where you hit the ball until it falls through the slot. You will have to explain that it is only for hitting the ball and not for hitting other things, and do take it away if they don’t listen. This is always a VERY supervised activity. But, it is also great if you see they are getting frustrated with something. Break out the mallet and ball and let them hit it. We also redirected by doing high fives. As soon as my daughter would bring her hand up to hit something we would put our hand out and say “Hi five!” and showed her how to do it. Then we would laugh. It almost always worked to redirect her from anger to a game. GL!

  5. jessicawp Apr 13 at 12:46 pm Reply Reply

    Perfect timing with this question, my son is 2 and in the middle of a hitting and kicking phase. It only happens at home, never at school, and my husband and I have no idea how to handle it. I went directly to the link and just ordered the books and hopefully they will help, because our time outs and talking about how we don’t hit and kick is doing nothing.

  6. Karen Apr 13 at 12:51 pm Reply Reply

    I swore I’d never use the crib for timeout either until I got whacked one too many times and needed to put my daughter there (same age) so I could cool off. 1-2 min only, I dispassionately tell her she’s doing timeout because she hit mama (or my husband or the dog) and that’s wrong. It’s easier to be unemotional about it if you have a zero tolerance policy like Amy and don’t let your anger build up. She doesn’t like timeout and if she’s still hitting and throwing when I come back then something else is wrong like she’s tired or hungry and I address that issue. Despite her timeout location, she loves her crib. She sits in it and talks to her animals, reads her basket full of story books, etc. The crib isn’t punishment, it’s where we go to cool our jets until she’s older and then she’ll “go to her room” (as will grownups) to cool their jets. And if she starts throwing or hitting in public (restaurant, etc.) we leave as soon as possible for a more appropriate environment in which she can exercise her developmental stage. My touchy-feely “let’s work through this” parenting ends at bad behavior.

  7. Hillary Apr 13 at 1:25 pm Reply Reply

    Great question, great answer, and great comments! While consistency is critical, MR’s comment about redirecting is also REALLY important – it is a chance for you and your son to not go through the whole behavior correction rigmarole that can be really draining for you. My daughter is not at this point yet (although she’s throwing her food occasionally), but we have a crazy dog and the trainer that finally helped us change his behavior always says ‘correct, redirect, reward!’ (I think there are a LOT of overlaps in training dogs and children.) You’re not likely to have a successful timeout when your kids are so young and you have 2 of them. So, to the extent you can deliver the ‘no’ message and then change it into a high five or another type of game/good behavior that you can reward, the more successful I suspect you’ll be. Beware of ‘training burnout’ where you just feel like nothing you are doing is working and you’re discouraged and unhappy with your child and yourself and your method of changing behavior. Since you know this is going to be a long haul, definitely try to ‘set your son up for success’ (i.e., put him in a situation where he is too distracted to throw stuff/hit) so you can reward good behavior – it will help him feel good, but it will really help YOU feel good and feel like all of your effort is paying off.

  8. Stefanie Apr 13 at 1:42 pm Reply Reply

    I nearly sent this very same question a few weeks ago when my once sweet all the time and gives everyone hugs 16 month old turned into that kid who hits everyone and the dog and thinks it’s funny. My sister recommended Hands are not for Hitting, and my daughter LOVES it. Sure, she smacked me in the face the first time we read it, but the hitting has lessened quite a bit. When she does hit, we say in a normal tone “hands are not for hitting” and redirect her to another activity. If she throws food while eating, we take her out of her highchair and let her finish eating when she’s done testing her limits and wants to actually eat.
    One thing I struggle with is knowing whether or not it’s ok to let her hit her toys. My instinct says that since she considers her stuffed animals her “friends”, we should discourage her from hitting them the same way we would us or the dog, but what about allowing her to take out her frustrations safely? Is 16 months simply too young for her to understand that? And where does it stop? Is it ok for her to push Elmo out of her stroller in favor of another stuffed animal but not ok for her to whack him on the head? What do other people do in situations like this?

  9. a Apr 13 at 4:57 pm Reply Reply

    My 20-month-old LOVES to clean-up after he throws his food. He asks for the sponge and the broom. We now say, “Oh, looks like you’re done eating. Now you can wait in your chair until I’m done, too.” It’s not working yet, but it’s the best thing we can think of :)

    We’re still struggling with the toy-throwing and hair-pulling. It always seems to be in play, not in anger, though, so we’re trying to be calm, stay on message (he’s language-delayed, so we go with the simple, direct “don’t throw toys” and “ow! that hurts!”), and just ride it out.

  10. Jill Apr 14 at 11:52 am Reply Reply

    Perfect timing with this question for us also. I thought I was the only one. Thanks for the great advice, all!

  11. Melissa Apr 14 at 12:42 pm Reply Reply

    So I think I may have just been dropped out of the running for parent of the year. My 14 month old has been throwing food almost for as long as he’s been eating in a high chair. BUT we also have a dog who is constantly at the side of his chair begging, and the “throwing” usually consists of wanting to feed the dog. When I say “no” and take the food away, he says “doggie.” he throws toys and his ball too, but only so he can go chase after them, never at anyone or really even high enough to do damage. Oh, and because he’s all boy, he loves to bang on things, but only with his hands (and again, he hasn’t hit a person). So, I guess all this is to say I haven’t been all that concerned, but you guys are making me think I really should be and should be disciplining this behavior. He has always been feisty, and is in full-on toddler tantrum mode now, and I don’t really know how to discipline. He understands “no” but I can’t imagine him understanding time outs right now. I try to say “we don’t throw” and redirect, but I can’t tell that I’m doing much (and truthfully, I should be more consistent). Have I irreparably damaged my child (kidding, sort of) and set us on the path to permanent bad behavior?

  12. Julie Apr 14 at 2:08 pm Reply Reply

    Thank you! Thank you! This post is just what I needed. Have a 15 month old daughter who loves to throw her food on the floor. We thought we had it bad when she spent her 6th-12th months spitting her food out at us at every meal and were so pleased when she finally grew out of that behavior. There is simply no reasoning with a 7month old! We waited it out. Her finally stopping that one was just a teaser, though and we’ve been stuck in the throwing food phase for a few months. A few weeks ago I finally cracked and gave her a time out. She throws food we say, “No. No. Don’t throw your food.” Sometimes she actually stops, but usually she loves the game, so I took her out of her high chair and plopped her tush on the floor in a good time-out spot. Told her “No. No. We don’t throw food” and she HOWLED like we had broken her heart (which, of course in her 15 month old mind, we had). But, she stayed put, which I was shocked by! A minute later, I picked her up, gave her a kiss, and she walked over to watch Mommy pick the food up off the floor. We’ve given her a few time-outs since and she screams brokenheartedly (actually, kind of cute!), but she stays put. I see many, many months of this in my future.

    So, good to know I’m normal, my toddler is normal, and Amy keeps offering up the perfect advice!

  13. MR Apr 14 at 3:08 pm Reply Reply

    Stefanie, that’s a good question. I had to think about it to remember what we did. If she shoved one toy aside for another, we wouldn’t really say anything. But, if she just whacked a toy for no reason, and it wasn’t a whacking toy like the ball through the peg thing or one of those weird clown punching bag things, we used to say “Ow, that hurt Elmo! Elmo doesn’t like to be hit. Elmo likes to be petted.” and take her arm and show her how to pet gently. We did the same thing when she would hit our animals. When she was old enough, we also made her say sorry to the animals when she hit them. Now (she’s 2.5) she goes in timeout immediately (because she is old enough to know better) and has to apologize to them when she gets out. We also directed her when she was angry that she could hit a pillow or cushion, like hitting the couch, but she never really got into that. It worked more effectively to just teach her to pet gently. She was young enough to not be able to differentiate between a living animal and a stuffed animal, so we just treated them both the same.

    Of course, now she is old enough to know that when you tell her not to hit that kicking is different, so then she tries to kick you instead. But, for the most part, her hitting and kicking is purely out of frustration now, as it only happens when you tell her something she doesn’t like or say no. So, we remind her that hitting and kicking aren’t ok, but that she can use her words to express her anger or frustration. I think I need to reread that part of “Happiest Toddler on the Block” though. I read it before she really got into too much of this, and now that we are full force, could use a refresher.

  14. Dan Apr 14 at 3:59 pm Reply Reply

    I’ve always allowed my son (now 5) to hit/drag/hurl/put in time out his best stuffed animal with the idea that this is the one thing HE is in control over. We discipline him and he disciplines his tiger. He is not allowed to throw him or do anything that will injure another person but he’s has autonomy otherwise.

    Otherwise with anything else, he would go in timeout and redirect. Simple phrases like No hitting worked really well. Now that he is older we have a reward system in place. I’ve found that positive reinforcement works worlds better than negative. While my first instinct is to take away things it doesn’t work near as well as rewarding the good behavior. BTW, his reward system? Aquarium rocks. He loves rocks so he gets a rock everytime he is good. (Whenever and whatever dada and I feel like rewarding), they are never taken away. Once he earns them, they are his. Later he can turn them in for tv time, playdates, trips to the park, extra books at bedtime or mcdonalds, etc. I was AMAZED at how much his attitude changed when we started this.

  15. Jill Apr 15 at 6:55 am Reply Reply

    My concern here is that kids this age do not understand negative sentences. So when you say “Toys are not for throwing” they understand “Toys are for throwing” and then are punished for doing what you told them to do. I would try “We play with toys” “We eat crackers” etc. and let them know what it is you would like them to do, rather than the negative. It’s much less confusing.

  16. professormama Apr 15 at 1:12 pm Reply Reply

    Amy’s response and suggestions are great. Both our kids went through the same phase, now 6 and nearly 2, it’s in the past.  
    It’s so important to communicate with them clearly and consistently, and react calmly, in a serious way- it’s not a game.  
    Clear statements, using words the kids understand, even touching the objects and saying this is hard, this is soft when explaining, to be clear they know what is being explained. Unless there are serious developmental delays, which it sounds like there are not, they are capable of understanding, and learning the information.
    We introduced games where new found throwing skills could be practiced and enjoyed when each of our kids hit this phase. 
    You know, throwing appropriate times and places, and maybe most importantly what kind of things we throw.  Kids learn fast, food is not for throwing, toy trucks and dolls are not for throwing, felt balls are for throwing, hurray!
    Also, as the mother of a 6 year old boy… the reality is most boys need outlets for physical energy, they NEED to throw and run and climb, they need opportunities to kick and throw their little bodies around so then they can sit down and read to their little sister, or draw, or write a story.  
    These boys are reaching an age where they may need to be provided with specific opportunities to get the crazy out, it could be going outside, or just setting up a basket in their room they can try trowing their stuffed animals into. As young toddlers, giving them time to use up some energy and then settle down prior to an activity that requires calm behavior can really help.

  17. professormama Apr 15 at 1:12 pm Reply Reply

    Amy’s response and suggestions are great. Both our kids went through the same phase, now 6 and nearly 2, it’s in the past.  
    It’s so important to communicate with them clearly and consistently, and react calmly, in a serious way- it’s not a game.  
    Clear statements, using words the kids understand, even touching the objects and saying this is hard, this is soft when explaining, to be clear they know what is being explained. Unless there are serious developmental delays, which it sounds like there are not, they are capable of understanding, and learning the information.
    We introduced games where new found throwing skills could be practiced and enjoyed when each of our kids hit this phase. 
    You know, throwing appropriate times and places, and maybe most importantly what kind of things we throw.  Kids learn fast, food is not for throwing, toy trucks and dolls are not for throwing, felt balls are for throwing, hurray!
    Also, as the mother of a 6 year old boy… the reality is most boys need outlets for physical energy, they NEED to throw and run and climb, they need opportunities to kick and throw their little bodies around so then they can sit down and read to their little sister, or draw, or write a story.  
    These boys are reaching an age where they may need to be provided with specific opportunities to get the crazy out, it could be going outside, or just setting up a basket in their room they can try trowing their stuffed animals into. As young toddlers, giving them time to use up some energy and then settle down prior to an activity that requires calm behavior can really help.

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